The Resilient Revolution

Juan Cole:

The contest between the Baath Party in Syria and its opposition over the past year has been surprising in its perseverence and longevity despite a stand-off that has given neither side any real reason for optimism. Usually when a popular movement has no real successes for months on end, it gradually peters out, as happened in Iran in 2009-2010

To me this is the most defining feature of the Syrian uprising. Even if you don’t care about the people or the country, your curiosity must be by now begging for answers: What is it that makes people go out on demonstrations, month, after month, after month, braving real danger, fatigue and indifference from the rest of the world?

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  • daverushmore

    I think it’s because they know that as soon as they stop the regime will catch its breath and systematically come after them one by one. At a time of its own choosing. That’s what it’s designed to do.

    It’s not designed to develop the economy or serve the people’s needs. It’s designed to oppress them, steal from them, imprison them and kill them. And now it’s being challenged.

    So they have to see this through to the bitter end. They have no choice. They’re dead if they dont.

  • GK

    The Syrian revolutionary have no choice! They will be eliminated completely if they fail. Hama is an example! After the uprising in 1980s, the regime went after anyone who showed any sympathy to Muslim Brotherhood! May Allah give them victory!

  • general

    And the answer is simple. What makes these people go out on demonstrations, month, after month, after month, braving real danger, fatigue and indifference from the rest of the world is Sectarianism. They, the fundementalist Sunnis, hate Alawites, and Alawites hate Sunnis, which is also the reason why Alawites are fighting alongside the regime to the death.